Washington Trade Daily

Calendar Trade Links Who We Are Take a Trial

If you have a hand in trade, you need an eye on Washington.  Washington Trade Daily gives you the information you need about international trade in Washington, Geneva and around the globe when you need it. WTD is emailed  every evening from Washington.  Subscribers also receive special email alerts whenever important breaking news happens throughout the day.

A one-year subscription costs only $785 for 260 issues; $400 for six months or $1,570 for two years and two months.

Take a look at the sample issue and the latest calendar on the next page.  If you like what you see, request a FREE no-obligation four-week trial subscription by clicking here or e-mailing us at washingtontradedaily@gmail.com

_____________________________________________________


 Volume 23, Number 193                       Monday, September 29, 2014

Trade Reports International Group

________________________________________________________________________


Some ‘Deliverables’ From India Meet

 Senior Administration officials briefing the press on Friday suggested that some “deliverables” would emerge from this week’s meeting between President Obama and new Indian Prime Minister Modi, but more important would the tenor of the personal relationship which could lead to closer ties across-the-board over the following next several months (WTD, 9/24/14).

 The new Prime Minister meets at the White House today and Tuesday.  He also speaks to the Council on Foreign Relations this afternoon and addresses the US-India Business Council tomorrow.

 One official suggested that there will be a strong focus on defense and security issues between the two countries in the talks, but also include cooperative efforts in clean energy and climate change.  Trade was mentioned in only general terms.

 Washington, said one official, has noticed that the new Prime Minister has shown some signals of economic reforms and steps he is taking to create efficient, accountable and transparent government.

 The officials pointed out that two-way trade with India has quintupled in the past decade – to $100 billion currently.  “And there’s no reason why that trade can’t grow another five-fold if we can take the steps to strengthen economic partnership, cooperation and integration and enable freer flow of investment between our two countries,” commented one official.

Food Security/TFA

 “Robust” conversations with Indian officials on trade will continue, including the ongoing diplomatic crisis in Geneva on New Delhi’s insistence on resolving the issues over the legality of food stockpiling programs in developing countries and final acceptance of the Trade Facilitation Agreement, one official commented.

 Intellectual property protection and India’s various constraints on foreign investment are other issues that Washington intends to pursue with Mr. Modi, the official commented.

 In more general terms, the official predicted high-level discussions on how the United States can partner with India on its economic goals and objectives – including priorities in infrastructure development, manufacturing and skills improvement.

 Washington also wants to work with India toward energy security, with a focus on clean technology.

 India has called for greater partnership with the United States on knowledge and technical assistance and learning, the official pointed out.  There are some 40 bilateral working groups now underway, the officials noted.

 President Obama will host a private dinner with the Prime Minister on Monday evening, which will be followed by bilateral sessions on Tuesday in the Oval Office.  Those meetings will be followed by a large lunch hosted by the Vice President and the Secretary of State.

        



Keeping Up With Dispute Cases

 Geneva – The World Trade Organization’s dispute settlement system is struggling to keep up with the growing number of cases, Director General Roberto Azevêdo told the Dispute Settlement Body on Friday.

 The WTO is facing an “unprecedented” volume of work, the Director General said.  The choice of countries to avail themselves of the WTO’s dispute settlement mechanism shows the system is working, but it also is putting pressure on the organization to keep up with the workload.  Not only are more and more cases being filed, but the disputes are increasingly complex and the number of WTO staff available to handle them is severely limited.

 “We are in a situation where the demand is severely testing our capacity,” the Director General said.  “And there are some clear constraints on our ability to extend that capacity – such as the budgetary situation and some aspects of how the system was designed.”

 In just under 20 years since the system came into being, 482 requests for consultation have been received, compared to a total of 300 disputes in the 47 years of the old General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, he said.  Those 482 disputes encompassed more than $1 trillion in trade flows.  Currently, there are 19 active panels requiring full-time assistance, 3 ongoing appeals and 4 panels in composition.  The rate of appeal in particular has been higher than expected when negotiators created a body of seven part-time staff, the Director General stated.

 In addition, disputes are generally much more complex now than they were in the first decade.  It is now common for disputes to involve multiple parties advancing a variety of claims with more voluminous submissions, increased third-party participation, more demand for translation and greater procedural complexity.  At the same time, the WTO has difficulty retaining dispute settlement lawyers, who can make far more money in the private sector, according to Mr. Azevêdo.

 All this adds up to delays in the litigation process, the WTO chief added.  “All these factors explain why some members are experiencing delays with panels getting up and running after composition.  It also explains why the Appellate Body will need more than 90 days to complete some appeals over the coming months and why parties may have to wait for an appeal slot to become available,” he said.

 Some developing countries have added their own criticism of the Appellate Body and lack of resources to follow through on judgements.  Some envoys pointed out to WTD in light of the Director General’s presentation the lack of compliance by the United States in a number of cases that involve developing countries.  The DSB has not been able to provide relief to developing countries when they win trade dispute against the United States, the envoy added.

Servansing

 Separately, the DSB approved the appointment of former Mauritian trade envoy Shree Baboo Chekitan Servansing as a member in the Appellate Body.

 But his approval did not come without some criticism about the system.  Saudi Arabia, India and Egypt expressed concern over lack of transparency and non-adherence to rules in the selection process. DSB chair Fernando de Mateo admitted that the process is not “perfect” and there is room for improvement.

 Mr. Servansing’s appointment was based more on his negotiating skills among members than any legal credentials, WTD was told.  He was instrumental in the past at the WTO in coordinating the stances of the small-nation Africa/Caribbean/Pacific group.

       



Russian Duties on European Vehicles

 Geneva – Russia on Friday blocked the first-time request by the European Union for establishment of a World Trade Organization dispute panel to adjudicate over antidumping duties imposed by Moscow on light commercial vehicles from Germany and Italy (WTD, 9/17/14).

 Brussels said consultations with Russia failed to settle the issue “out of court.”

 Russia maintained that the EU was not serious about reaching an accommodation.

 Germany and Italy can pursue their complaint at next month’s DSB meeting.

 Meanwhile, Argentina appealed an August dispute panel decision about its unreasonable import restrictive measures (WTD, 8/25/14).  The United States – along with the European Union and Japan – had scored a victory over Argentina on their allegations that various import licensing practices were unfairly keeping their products out of the market.

 A dispute panel found that the import restrictions violate WTO rules because they require potential importers to first agree to export Argentine goods, make investments in the country, lower prices, refrain from repatriating profits and incorporate local content into domestically produced goods.

       



Around the Globe

             ●          The European Union’s trade commissioner-designate stumbled into a political minefield on Saturday by suggesting she wanted to exclude a controversial investor protection clause from a planned EU-U.S. trade agreement, Reuters news service reported from Brussels (WTD, 9/24/14).  A European Commission source said however that the furor was the result of an error in a leaked draft version of testimony by Sweden’s Cecilia Malmstrom that would be corrected in the final version.

 A German member of the European Parliament for the Greens posted on his website the written responses of Malmstrom, put forward to be trade commissioner in Jean-Claude Juncker’s new European Commission, to questions posed by legislators before Malmstrom’s confirmation hearing on Monday.  In her prepared answers, Malmstrom addressed concerns over a dispute settlement provision that could form part of an ambitious EU-U.S. free trade agreement that is under negotiation.  Consumer and environmental groups and some EU lawmakers have been particularly critical of investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS), a provision allowing foreign companies to bring claims against a country if it breaches a trade treaty.  They say including it in the EU-U.S. trade deal, known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), would limit a country’s right to pass laws to protect its citizens or the environment.

 In the document posted on EU lawmaker Sven Giegold’s website, Malmstrom quotes Juncker as saying that no limitation of the jurisdiction of courts in EU member states would be accepted in the new transatlantic trade agreement.  “This clearly means that no investor-state dispute settlement mechanism will be part of that agreement,” the document quoted Juncker as saying.  “I fully support this approach of the President-elect (Juncker) and will work in this sense in the negotiations,” Malmstrom said.

 Malmstrom’s comment was pounced on by political opponents of the investor protection mechanism.

             ●          Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and U.S. Vice President Joe Biden agreed Friday to continue working with flexibility toward a Pacific free trade deal and to work closely together to deal with Islamic State militants, a Japanese official said according to a Kyodo news service report (WTD, 9/26/14).  Meeting in New York on the fringes of the U.N. General Assembly, Abe told Biden that both countries need to make concessions given the lack of progress on contentious issues during ministerial talks earlier this week.

 Biden agreed and called for more efforts to overcome differences, according to Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Hiroshige Seko who attended the meeting.  U.S. trade representative Michael Froman, who accompanied Biden in the talks, made no comments regarding TPP-related issues, Seko said.  Froman held negotiations with Akira Amari, Japanese minister in charge of the TPP, earlier this week without making headway over thorny bilateral issues, such as Japan’s desire to maintain significant tariffs on some agricultural produce or U.S. demands aimed at gaining freer access to the Japanese automotive market.

 Japan, the United States and 10 other countries that account for about 40 percent of the global economy are engaged in the TPP talks. But lack of progress in bridging differences between Japan and United States, the two largest economies in the talks, has held back the overall negotiations.

 The White House released a statement Friday saying that Mr. Biden and the Prime Minister agreed on “the need to resolve outstanding bilateral issues in the TransPacific Partnership negotiations, including on agriculture and automobiles, as soon as possible.”

             ●          EU countries are planning to tell Russia it has no say on changing the Ukraine trade treaty despite its demands to rewrite the text, the EU Observer reported (WTD, 9/26/14).  The joint declaration, by the EU Council and European Commission, is to say the trade pact: “is a bilateral [EU-Ukraine] agreement and any adaptations to it can only be made at the request of one of the parties and with the agreement of the other.”

 It notes Ukraine should “continue the process of envisaged reforms and economic modernisation” related to Titles III, V, VI, and VII of the pact.  It also says Ukraine should go ahead with “adequate preparation for the implementation of Title IV.”  Titles III, V, VI, and VII spell out reforms in the areas of justice and security, economic affairs, financial and anti-fraud matters, and institution-building.  Title IV deals with trade and the mutual lifting of tariffs on EU and Ukrainian exports.  The EU declaration is to be published in Brussels on Monday (29 September) by ministers at a general affairs council. Ministers will the same day adopt a legal act saying the bulk of the treaty is to be implemented “without delay,” but that Title IV is to be implemented on 1 January 2016.

 Separately, Russian energy minister Alexander Novak has warned that EU states which re-export gas to Ukraine will face cut-offs, with Hungary already stopping its reverse flow.  Novak spoke in German daily Handelsblatt on Friday (26 September) morning ahead of talks in Berlin later the same day between the European Commission and Russian and Ukrainian energy officials.

 “The contracts signed [between Russia and EU clients] do not have any provisions for re-exports … We hope that our European partners respect the past agreements. That is the only way to guarantee uninterrupted supplies,” he said.  Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia earlier this year began shipping Russian gas to Ukraine in order to help it cope in winter after Russia stopped supplying Ukraine in a price dispute which is bogged down in legal arbitration.

             ●         Washington stands ready to help Ukraine attract private US investment if Kiev acts to root out corruption, a senior US official said Saturday, without pledging any more direct aid for the war-torn country, Agence France-Presse reported from Kiev (WTD, 9/26/14).  “The US has a stake in helping Ukraine build a stable and prosperous country that benefits all of its citizens,” US Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker said after meeting Ukraine’s leaders.

 This could involve bringing private US investors to Ukraine to “showcase historic investment opportunities” in the former Soviet nation, she said, pointing to defence and energy as particularly important sectors.  Drawing parallels with the Marshall plan – a US aid initiative to help rebuild Europe after World War II – Pritzker said Ukraine must reform its economy if it is to overcome its “significant economic challenges.”  But she stopped short of pledging any massive US investment to rebuild Ukraine’s tattered economy, as Washington did to help Europe in 1947. The US has so far provided Kiev with $291 million (229 million euros) in assistance and a $1 billion loan guarantee.

 “These steps are going to be hard but they can change the future of your country,” she told reporters after meeting with Ukraine’s President Petro Poroshenko and Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk.  “(The Marshall plan) included adoption of a tremendous number of reforms in order for the economy to be more open and accessible for foreign direct investment, and that is precisely what we were discussing.”

             ●           China announced Sunday the lifting of restrictions on foreign investment for several industries, from green tea to civil airplane engines, in a special free trade zone in the business hub of Shanghai, the Associated Press news service reported (WTD, 9/19/14).  The new rules affect 27 industries, also including automobiles and infrastructure, and represent a mix of concessions over the rules that apply elsewhere on the mainland.

 Some of the limits on industry investment by foreign companies in joint ventures with Chinese firms will go from 49 per cent to 51 per cent or greater, including in the shipping industry, China’s State Council said on its website.  In some other industries, such as companies developing high-speed rail technology, passenger trains, yachts and luxury liners, sole foreign ownership will be allowed in the Shanghai zone, whereas elsewhere in China the firms must have a local partner, the statement said. Foreign companies producing traditional Chinese tea will be allowed in the Shanghai zone under joint ventures, whereas elsewhere they are not allowed at all, the statement said.

 Piecemeal changes so far have included easing controls on bank lending and the free-trade zone established in Shanghai in September 2013.  But Beijing has yet to tackle fundamental changes such as curbing the dominance of state companies that the previous generation of leaders spent the past decade building up.

             ●        Opening up Brazil to more foreign trade would be a “disaster for Brazilian industry,” Trade Minister Mauro Borges said in newspaper interview on Saturday, rebuffing a common plea among business leaders in Latin America’s largest economy, Reuters news service reported (WTD, 9/25/14).  Fewer trade barriers would lead to the “Mexicanization” of Brazilian industry, Borges told Folha de S.Paulo, turning the country’s factories into little more than an assembly line for foreign firms and weakening Brazil’s manufacturing supply chain. His comments may offer a preview of Brazilian trade policy for the next four years should President Dilma Rousseff win re-election next month.

 Mexico’s light assembly factories, or “maquiladoras,” are often used by U.S. firms to take advantage of cheap labor, with goods usually exported back to the U.S. market. They account for nearly two-thirds of the country’s non-oil exports at about $196 billion a year, according to 2013 data.  In contrast, Brazilian industry is mostly focused on the domestic market, with local manufacturers protected by high import tariffs, local content rules for government procurement contracts, subsidized credit and a wave of stimulus measures to boost output and protect jobs.

 Yet Brazilian firms have struggled for years because of poor infrastructure and high costs. The manufacturing sector is expected to contract 1.94 percent in 2014, according to a central bank survey released this week.  Many business leaders believe lower trade barriers would help cut the cost of inputs and make local industry more competitive in the global marketplace. Borges also told Folha that he is against a trade deal with the United States as both economies “would not be prepared” for such an agreement, citing the unlikelihood of U.S. congressional approval and low import tariffs between the two countries.

             ●        Mexico registered a $1.12 billion trade deficit in August as growth in imports outpaced that of exports, which were limited by lower shipments of oil and mining products, the Wall Street Journal reported.  Exports rose 2.1% to $33.36 billion, and imports were up 4.8% from August 2013 at $34.48 billion, the National Statistics Institute, or Inegi, said Friday. It brought the trade balance for the first eight months of the year to a deficit of $2.35 billion.




   —  —



*****   WTD is intended for readers within the office that subscribes.  PLEASE do not redistribute.  *****



Take a look at our newly designed homepage at:

http://www.washingtontradedaily.com

We are sure you will see something you like.

Sign up for WTD’s special email alert system which keeps you informed of major trade-related news throughout the day.  Simply email WTD your email address and we will add you to the list.  

Email:  washingtontradedaily@gmail.com


WTD now has available for sale compact disks for all of 1988 through 2013 – for $35 each year.

To order call 301-946-0817, fax us at 301-946-2631 or e-mail us at washingtontradedaily@gmail.com




On the Web......

 

Agriculture


ASEAN.  Association of Southeast Asian Nations statements on its agricultural ministers meeting.  (available at:  http://www.asean.org/news/asean-statement-communiques/item/thirty-sixth-meeting-of-the-asean-minister-on-agriculture-and-forestry-36th-amaf?category_id=26 and http://www.asean.org/news/asean-statement-communiques/item/the-fourteenth-meeting-of-the-asean-ministers-on-agriculture-and-forestry-and-the-ministers-of-agriculture-of-the-people-s-republic-of-china-japan-and-the-republic-of-korea-14th-amaf-plus-three?category_id=26 )  issued:  9/26/14.



Asia


ASEAN.  Association of Southeast Asian Nations statements on its agricultural ministers meeting.  (available at:  http://www.asean.org/news/asean-statement-communiques/item/thirty-sixth-meeting-of-the-asean-minister-on-agriculture-and-forestry-36th-amaf?category_id=26 and http://www.asean.org/news/asean-statement-communiques/item/the-fourteenth-meeting-of-the-asean-ministers-on-agriculture-and-forestry-and-the-ministers-of-agriculture-of-the-people-s-republic-of-china-japan-and-the-republic-of-korea-14th-amaf-plus-three?category_id=26 )  issued:  9/26/14.



Canada


European Union.  Canadian statement on the Canada-European Union trade agreement.  (available at:  https://mail.google.com/mail/u/1/#inbox/148b2afcd4ff47d8 )  issued:  9/26/14.


European Union.  European Union statement on the EU-Canada trade agreement.  (available at:  http://www.euintheus.org/press-media/eu-canada-summit/ and http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_SPEECH-14-631_en.htm )  issued:  9/26/14.


Trade Policy.  Canadian government statement on its trade policy.  (available at:  http://www.international.gc.ca/media/dev/news-communiques/2014/09/26a.aspx?lang=eng )  issued:  9/26/14.



European Union


Canada.  Canadian statement on the Canada-European Union trade agreement.  (available at:  https://mail.google.com/mail/u/1/#inbox/148b2afcd4ff47d8 )  issued:  9/26/14.


European Union.  European Union statement on the EU-Canada trade agreement.  (available at:  http://www.euintheus.org/press-media/eu-canada-summit/ and http://europa.eu/rapid/press-release_SPEECH-14-631_en.htm )  issued:  9/26/14.



Export-Import Bank


Morocco.  US Export-Import Bank announcement of proposed sale of aircraft to Morocco.  (available at:  http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2014-09-29/html/2014-23043.htm )  issued:  9/29/14.



India


US Relations.  White House background briefing on the visit to Washington of Indian Prime Minister Modi.  (available at:  http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/09/26/background-briefing-conference-call-upcoming-visit-prime-minister-india )  issued:  9/26/14.


India.  Statement by Sen. Menendez on US relations with India.  (available in the Congressional Record of September 18 ).



Information Technology


ITA.  Information Technology and Innovation Foundation statement on the Information Technology Agreement negotiations.  (available at:  http://itic.org/dotAsset/9/c/9c29a8cb-43b1-44b4-a52e-97403e4b4c9e.pdf )  issued:  9/28/14.



Japan


US Relations.  White House statement on meeting between Vice President Biden and Japanese Prime Minister Abe in New York.  (available at:  http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/09/26/readout-vice-president-s-meeting-japanese-prime-minister-shinzo-abe )  issued:  9/26/14.



Morocco



Ex-Im Bank.  US Export-Import Bank announcement of proposed sale of aircraft to Morocco.  (available at:  http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2014-09-29/html/2014-23043.htm )  issued:  9/29/14.



Poland


Trade Mission.  Commerce Department statement on trade mission to Poland and Turkey.  (available at:  http://www.commerce.gov/blog/2014/09/26/secretary-penny-pritzker-lead-high-level-us-business-delegation-poland-and-turkey )  issued:  9/26/14.



Trade Policy


ACTN.  White House announcement of appointees to the White House advisory committee on trade negotiations.  (available at:  http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2014/09/25/president-obama-announces-more-key-administration-posts )  issued:  9/25/14.



Turkey


Trade Mission.  Commerce Department statement on trade mission to Poland and Turkey.  (available at:  http://www.commerce.gov/blog/2014/09/26/secretary-penny-pritzker-lead-high-level-us-business-delegation-poland-and-turkey )  issued:  9/26/14.



Ukraine


Trade Mission.  Commerce Department statement on trade mission to Ukraine.  (available at:  http://www.commerce.gov/news/press-releases/2014/09/27/us-secretary-commerce-penny-pritzker-makes-first-ever-visit-ukraine )  issued:  9/27/14.



World Trade Organization


DSB.  World Trade Organization Director General Azevedo statement on the Dispute Settlement Understanding.  (available at:  http://www.wto.org/english/news_e/spra_e/spra32_e.htm )  issued:  9/26/14.


RTA.  Remarks by World Trade Organization Director General Azevedo on regional trade agreements.  (available at:  http://www.wto.org/english/news_e/spra_e/spra33_e.htm )  issued:  9/26/14.


What we’re covering this week –

    New Indian Prime Minister Modi comes to Washington this week for his first official meeting with President Obama.  Meanwhile, the 7th round of negotiations on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership is held all week.

             ●          The TTIP negotiations kick off on Monday.

             ●          Also Monday, the Association of American Chambers of Commerce in Latin America sponsors its annual Latin America forecast conference.  Peruvian Trade Minister Magali Silva Velarde-Alvarez and US Trade Representative Michael Froman are among the scheduled speakers.

             ●          The Council on Foreign Relations holds a live stream webcast with Indian Prime Minister Modi.

             ●          Tuesday, the Coalition of Services Industries holds its annual Global Services Summit with speakers including US Trade Representative Michael Froman and World Trade Organization Director General Roberto Azevedo – who will be speaking via webcast.

             ●          The US-India Business Council hosts a reception and policy address by Indian Prime Minister Modi.

             ●          Also Tuesday, the Council of the Americas sponsors a program on strengthening North American supply chains.  Mexican Ambassador Eduardo Medina Mora is among the speakers.

             ●          Wednesday, the TTIP chief negotiators hold a stakeholders briefing.

             ●          The Center for Strategic and International Studies sponsors a program on US-Vietnam relations.  Vietnam Deputy Prime Minister Pham Binh Minh is among the speakers.

             ●          Also Wednesday, the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies holds a discussion on the challenges facing the world trade system with speakers including Swedish Minister of Foreign Trade Ewa Bjorling.

             ●          Thursday, US Trade Representative Michael Froman is scheduled to speak at a Made for Trade conference sponsored by HSBC.

             ●          On Friday, the chief TTIP negotiators hold a closing press conference.

             ●          The Center for Strategic and International Studies holds its annual Asia Architecture conference.  USTR director for Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation affairs Edward Brzytwa is among the speakers.



Our  Blog

Updated:  9/20/14

WTD’s

Friday Afternoon

Podcast

Straight talk.   

Click the highlighted text to hear snippets from WTD’s straight talk.

•  House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Dave Camp speaks to WTD about prospects for Trade Promotion Authority legislation on September 18.

•  Visiting South African President Jacob Zuma was asked at the National Press Club on August 4 what impact has President Obama’s color had on US relations with Africa.

•  Comments by Senate Finance Committee Chairman Ron Wyden to the press on trade and transparency on July 16.

•  Australia News Network interviews World Trade Organization Director General Roberto Azevedo during his visit to the G-20 meetings in Sydney on July 17.

•  New House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy on June 22 tells Fox News Sunday why the US Export-Import Bank should end.

•  Here’s why Congressional ignorance can be very dangerous when it comes to willy-nilly support for free trade agreements, according to consumer advocate Ralph Nader.

 •  Here’s what’s at stake with Trade Promotion Authority and why Louisiana Republican Rep. Charles Boustany can’t sleep at night.

 •  Here’s what Wisconsin Republican Rep. Tom Petri said on the House floor April 10 about TTIP and Bratwurst.

 •  Here’s a brief interview with the Heritage Foundation’s Foundry report with House Financial Services Chair Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-Texas) on the dangers of renewing the US Export-Import Bank given April 17.

 •  Here’s a brief snippet from remarks April 8 by Senate Finance Committee ranking Republican Orrin Hatch saying he is befuddled over why the President says he supports Trade Promotion Authority but doesn’t do anything about.

 •  Here’s Aspen Institute scholar and former Reagan Administration Assistant Secretary of Commerce speaking about with WTD on the many iterations of a US-European Union free trade agreement after a recent Hudson Institute event.

 •  Here’s what veteran House Democrat Richard Neal (Mass) – one of four cochairs of the new House TTIP Caucus – told WTD during a reception celebrating the caucus creation on April 3.

 •  Here’s what World Trade Organization chief spokesperson Keith Rockwell said in Washington on how and why the WTO is back.

 •  Here’s what Council of Economic Advisors Chair Jason Furman told the Joint Economic Committee last week about why there is so little mention of trade in the Economic Report of the President.

 •  This is why the European Union is wrong when it says it will never allow imports of US hormone-treated beef, Agriculture Secretary Vilsack tells WTD.

 

Welcome to WTD’s Homepage – and welcome to WTD’s monthly informal get-together

on October 17.


WTD’S FIRST INFORMAL GET-TOGETHER/DISCUSSION OVER DRINKS  (ALCOHOLIC AND NON-ALCOHOLIC) AT THE NATIONAL PRESS CLUB – OCTOBER 17.


IF YOU ARE IN WASHINGTON OR VISITING HERE NEXT MONTH, PLEASE ACCEPT THIS INVITATION TO A TRULY UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY.  COME JOIN OTHER WTD SUBSCRIBERS AND FRIENDS ON FRIDAY – OCTOBER 17 – FOR AN INFORMAL DISCUSSION (WAY OFF THE RECORD) ON THE CURRENT ‘HOT TOPICS’ IN TRADE  – AND WHAT’S COMING UP IN THE FUTURE.


TIME IS 4 PM TO 6 PM.


ADD TO THAT A TASTE OF LIQUOR, BEER, WINE OR POP (CASH BAR) AND THINGS COULD GET INTERESTING.


IT’S FREE.   JUST PAY FOR YOUR DRINKS, WHICH ARE REASONABLE – MATCHING THE ECONOMIC TASTES OF WORKING JOURNALISTS – strong, simple and cheap.


WE HOPE TO MAKE THIS A REGULAR AFFAIR – MONTHLY OR PERHAPS TWICE A MONTH.


THE EVENTS WILL TAKE PLACE ON THE 14TH FLOOR OF THE NATIONAL PRESS CLUB, AT 14TH AND F STREETS, NORTHWEST – inside the historical Washington bar.   There will be signs showing the way.


RESERVATIONS ARE NOT REQUIRED, BUT AN RSVP WOULD BE APPRECIATED.


FOR A START, THE OCTOBER 17 SESSION WILL BE VERY INFORMAL.  WE – JIM AND MARY BERGER – WILL KICK OFF THE DISCUSSION ON CURRENT TRADE ISSUES AND TAKE A LOOK AT WHAT’S COMING UP.  FUTURE EVENTS COULD FOCUS ON A PARTICULAR TIMELY TOPIC – AND WE HOPE TO HAVE INTRODUCTORY SPEAKERS TO START US OFF ON A PARTICULAR TOPIC.  VOLUNTEERS AND SUGGESTIONS ARE WELCOME.


THE AFFAIR IS OPEN TO ALL – SUBSCRIBERS, FRIENDS, ENEMIES AND ANYBODY WHO JUST WANDERS BY.


OUR AIM IS TO BRING TRADE BACK TO LIFE IN WASHINGTON.